Centre for Health Leadership & Enterprise

CLAHRC: Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care

The CLAHRC is a five-year NIHR project involving a joint collaboration between the Departments of Psychiatry, Engineering, Public Health and Cambridge Judge Business School (University of Cambridge) with the regional Mental Health Primary Care Trust. Visit the CLAHRC website to find out more »


Service Innovation in Healthcare: Knowledge Translation and Service Innovation - Mental Health (CLAHRC)

Michael Barrett, Eivor Oborn

The CLAHRC is a five-year NIHR project involving a joint collaboration between the Departments of Psychiatry, Engineering, Public Health and Cambridge Judge Business School (University of Cambridge) with the regional Mental Health Primary Care Trust. As the medical departments are conducting research into best practice, the engineers are working on soft system redesign. The School's management research team is studying the process of enabling service innovation and developing leadership capacity to support the change process. The key areas of this research include: effective brokering in knowledge networks, knowledge translation and effective multidisciplinary working, knowledge exchange and collaborative service innovation.

Outputs

Madden, E., Clare, I., Hall, M., Broughton, S., Gracey, F., Jones, E., Lillywhite, A., Malley, D., Oborn, E. and Holland A.J. (2010) "'Piggy in the middle'?: Practitioner researchers in a CLAHRC." SDO Conference, 6-7 October 2010, Sheffield, UK

Gracey, F., Malley, D., Oborn, E. and Clare, I. (2010) "'Complex problems, expert professionals' or 'full partners and expert patients'?: dimensions of discourses that guide practice in long-term conditions." SDO Conference, 6-7 October 2010, Sheffield, UK

Barrett, M., Farrington, C., Oborn, E. and McCabe, T. (2010) "Policy and professional projects: the case of community-based mental health teams." Academy of Management, 6-10 August 2010, Montreal, Canada

Racko, G., Barrett, M., Hinings, C.R. and Oborn, E. (2010) "Institutional work as a relational practice: a case study of a North American healthcare corporation." International Conference of Institutions and Work, 17-19 June 2010, Vancouver, Canada

Farrington, C.J.F., Jones, E., Madden, E., Malley, D., Stariradeva, I., Clare, I.C.H. and Oborn, E. (2010) "More questionnaires!: The experiences of members of community integrated specialist teams for people with intellectual disabilities." Health Service Research Network (HSRN) Conference, 2-3 June 2010, Manchester, UK (accepted as a poster paper)

Aristidou, A., Oborn, E. and Barrett, M. (2010) "Healthcare transitions: managing across organizational and jurisdictional boundaries in service delivery." IRSPM, 7-9 April 2010, Bern, Switzerland

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'Weak' Professions in Mental Healthcare: Social Work and Nursing in Community-based Teams (CLAHRC)

Conor Farrington, Michael Barrett, Eivor Oborn

Following processes of 'deinstitutionalisation', mental healthcare is now predominantly delivered by multidisciplinary community-based teams, comprising a mix of professions including nursing, social work, psychiatry, psychology, and occupational therapy. We focus on social work and nursing in order to investigate the impact of sweeping institutional change on professional identity, ethos, and jurisdiction, and in order to deepen our understanding of 'weak' professions in the healthcare context. Data collection points include interviews with practitioners, academics, managers, and policymakers, as well as reviewing relevant policy documents. The project aims to inform future policymaking regarding both mental healthcare and multidisciplinary teamwork.

Outputs

Farrington, C., Barrett, M. and Oborn, E. (2010) "Policy and professional projects: the case of community-based mental health teams." EGOS, July 2010, Lisbon, Portugal

Barrett, M., Farrington, C., Oborn, E. and McCabe, T. (2010) "Policy and professional projects: the case of community-based mental health teams." Academy of Management, 6-10 August 2010, Montreal, Canada

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Policy Lessons for Multidisciplinary Teamwork: Evidence from Community-based Learning Disability Teams (CLAHRC)

Conor Farrington, Michael Barrett, Eivor Oborn

As with mental healthcare, learning disability care is now predominantly delivered by multidisciplinary community-based teams. In collaboration with the CLAHRC Adult Theme (Department of Development Psychiatry), we evaluate the organisational health of five learning disability teams by implementing measures of organisational climate and culture alongside measures of personal fulfilment and 'burnout'. Data collection was conducted using a three-part questionnaire, incorporating three well-known survey instruments. The project aims to assist learning disability service managers in their efforts to reform and improve learning disability services in Cambridge; we also aim to inform future policymaking regarding both learning disability care and multidisciplinary teamwork.

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Knowledge Exchange and Service Innovation: Examining and Supporting GP Commissioning Consortia

Eivor Oborn, Michael Barrett, Markos Zachariadis

Over the next two years General Practitioner (GP) consortia will gradually take over the core commissioning functions of Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). As such these GP groups can be considered new organisational forms and will need to learn how to collaborate with numerous new stakeholders in order to accomplish their intended purpose. We will examine how GP consortia develop collaboration strategies in three ways:

  1. collaboration links between research or evidence based organisations - i.e. how evidence might find its way into the commissioning process through this area of knowledge transfer
  2. the nature of relationships and collaborative processes amongst stakeholder groups
  3. how the GP consortia learning networks expand and form their own new knowledge-sharing community

Outputs

Weidner, R., Oborn, E. and Barrett, M. (2011) "An evaluation of factors influencing mental health care commissioning decisions in practice." IRSPM, 11-13 April 2011, Dublin, Ireland (accepted for presentation)

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Communication, Collaboration, and Public and Patient Involvement (PPI) in the National Health Service

Conor Farrington

Jargon is notoriously common in the National Health Service, with policymakers, managers and healthcare professionals utilising language that hinders communication within the NHS and between the NHS and patients. This research stream explores the ways in which medical and managerial jargon obstructs doctor-patient communication and Public and Patient Involvement (PPI), and investigates managerial jargon as an integral part of an excessively 'managerialist' culture that serves to write patients out of healthcare policy and practice. On the grounds that better communication will assist the collaborative delivery of patient-centred care, this project also attempts to identify ways in which jargon use can be avoided in the contemporary NHS.

Outputs

Farrington, C. (2011) "Reconciling managers, doctors, and patients: the role of clear communication." Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (forthcoming)

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Service Innovation in Healthcare: Institutional Entrepreneurship for Service Innovation - National CLAHRC Evaluation

Michael Barrett, Eivor Oborn, Girts Racko

This project is being conducted with collaborators from Nottingham Business School. We examine key institutional challenges to, and potential institutional entrepreneurship solutions for, effective knowledge exchange through the CLAHRCs. We conceptualise CLAHRCs as a vehicle to mediate the institutional challenges that have historically stymied the effective transfer of research into practice. Using recent advances in institutional theory we aim to show how institutional change may be induced through the work of institutional entrepreneurs, endogenous actors, or groups of actors who seek to promote change in long-standing institutional arrangements.

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